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Archive for January, 2016|Monthly archive page

The Story Of Gary Casey

In Uncategorized on January 29, 2016 at 10:48 AM

man-speaking“Gary is a promising young man. He has good looks, personality, and he is likable. Our company has a good product but his numbers just aren’t where we need them to be” The CEO told me over the phone. “He is our worst performing sales rep and if he doesn’t bring his numbers up, we are going to cut him loose and we really don’t want to do that”.
A week later, I met Gary and the CEO over lunch. Gary was everything he was made out to be. It was hard to pinpoint why Gary was having trouble until I heard him talk.

Gary and I spent 3 sessions together determining his message, finding visual aids and improving his delivery techniques. He learned how to create a presentation that was meaningful to the audience; he learned to have a conversation that made the other person want to know more.

Other sales reps in the company noticed the change in Gary. His confidence was stronger, he was quieter, he smiled more, but mostly they watched his sales figures grow. Over the next several months, every other sales rep requested to work with me. The CEO was beaming as his sales were through the roof. Gary, his once bottom performer, was now his second highest performer with a sales increase of 600%. (yes, those are real numbers). He was giving a good chase to the number one performer and competition among the sales team was friendly, but very fierce. New incentives were offered and everyone was working on improving their presentations.
This company has a good product: literally a no-brainer to qualified customers: It provides a higher level of service at a lower cost. The solution was to help sales reps speak a language the customers could understand. They knew their product, believed it was good, but needed help conveying this in a manner the clients could understand.

iSpeakEASY can help you. Our custom workshops help you present your story in a manner that makes the client understand why they want (or even need) what you are offering.

Call (415 342-7106) or email to discuss how we can help your company grow.

 

Some Words Have No Meaning (So Why Use Them?)

In Uncategorized on January 28, 2016 at 7:46 PM

emptyDo you ever notice the words and phrases people use that have no meaning? They struggle to find something to say and throw in things that take up space but mean nothing. Words such as:

  • Obviously
  • Let me begin by saying
  • Clearly
  • Honestly
  • As you can see
  • Really
  • Well
  • Um
  • Ah
  • In fact
  • As ‘so and so’ just said
  • In addition
  • Let me say that
  • So anyway
  • Before we begin
  • As you already know
  • Actually
  • Right

These phrases are like filler in a hot dog – they offer nothing more than bulk. There is no nutritional value or meaning. They do take up space though.

These words seem silly when read in a list, but listen for them as people around you speak. A few of these words or phrases sprinkled in a conversation may have little effect and in some cases, they may be appropriate. Most of the time, they convey a single message: The speaker does not know what to say. This hurts your credibility.

A confident demeanor demonstrates you are an expert in your field. It shows that you know what you are doing and, have the experience required to make a wise statement.

If you find yourself feeling nervous or unsure what to say, use a pause to buy you time to think. Silence is a powerful and loud tool that demonstrates you are thoughtful and credible. It buys you time to think while building your credibility.

Listen to others speak: are they using filler? If they do, how do you react when they use it? What is the impression you get when you hear them? Watch other audience members to see their reactions as well. Look at the speaker and see if you can ascertain their emotions while they do this. Do you sense confidence or panic?

It is good to speak when you have something to say. If you have nothing to say, rather than use filler, just say nothing.

(if you have a word you like to add to the list, post it under comments. I will compile them a post the updated list)

© 2010 iSpeakEASY. All rights reserved – This speaking tip is one in a series provided by iSpeakEASY. We help people profit from their words. Call for information on individual coaching or group workshops.

This Is What Others Say About iSpeakEASY

In Uncategorized on January 7, 2016 at 11:56 AM

“You have been, in effect, a year’s worth of Toastmasters encapsulated into a couple of sessions.”

Clyde L. Schultz, Dentist and Professional Speaker

 

“I’ve attended many workshops on public speaking in my 35-year career – this was the most useful.”

David Belitsky, Suisun Resource Conservation District

 

“I’m so excited about this course. I received tremendous value and was able to immediately apply the new skills. My business is growing with some thanks due to this workshop.”

Coree Cameron, Partner, Cameron, Coffey and Kaye, A Professional Corporation

 

“I can’t think of a faster and more efficient way to improve communications in a business than to attend Ethan’s trainings.”

Anastasia Shuster, Access Speakers

 

“I’ve been using the booklet and speaking tips for my quarterly financial presentations. They have been very helpful reminders and have improved my presentations.”

Laurie Talcott, Chief Financial Officer, Point Reyes Bird Observatory

 

“I learned from the interactive format and everyone in the group was supportive. The feedback was invaluable and has helped me. I highly recommend this workshop.”

Imee Burkett, Isagenix International ID/Coach,

 

“The workshop was focus, supportive and fun.”

Robin Fett, Hypnotherapist,

 

“I got 6 new referrals following my first presentation. Thanks for your help and guidance.”

DJ Colbert, BNI Power Lunch

 

“Ethan helps companies become more profitable by helping them to close more accounts due to effective communication. I think he would be very beneficial to your sales team.”

Sarah Scudder, Golden Pacific Systems, Inc.

 

“The training session was exciting, well organized, and engaging. The materials were easy to understand we were given the tools to improve our speaking skills.”

Rainer Hoenicke, San Francisco Estuary Institute.

 

“At a recent gathering of scientists, presentations by staff who had attended an iSpeakEASY workshop were dynamic, engaging, conveyed information clearly, and held the audience’s attention.

Beth Huning, Coordinator, San Francisco Bay Joint Venture

A Tough Act To Follow.

In Uncategorized on January 5, 2016 at 9:44 AM

excellent speakerThe speaker on stage was excellent. She had it dialed in: the audience was attentive, involved and the room was full of energy and laughter. The man standing next to me leaned into me to whisper “She is really good. Sure glad I am not up next. That would be one tough act to follow”.

What this man did not realize is I was the next speaker and in a few minutes I would be taking the stage with this same audience. My assessment of the situation was quite the opposite of his though: I was delighted with what she was doing with the audience and how she was setting me up for success. I knew when I took over, the audience would be alive, active, fully charged and ready to take it to the next level. She had in essence, built a podium of success for to me to step up to.

As I took the stage, I acknowledged what a great speaker had preceded me. I reminded the audience of her energy and felt the room liven up again at just the thought. Then I worked my own magic on the audience and gave the audience my best. Being ready for the presentation helped: I had a clear goal, an outline, and used the confidence that comes with properly preparing to catapult the audience to new heights.

Many speakers, including the man I mentioned earlier, are intimidated in this situation and start with something like “That is one hard act to follow.” That type of statement implies you are intimidated and immediately lowers your credibility both to your audience and in your own mind.

The next time you find yourself following a really great presenter, rather than bring the energy down, boost it by taking one of these approaches:

  • Thank the speaker and highlight a part of the talk you found helpful
  • Acknowledge the speaker’s success to the audience, for example, open with” Wow! – That was one great presentation –don’t you think?”
  • “Let’s have another round of applause for that great presentation”
  • Highlight a point the speaker made and how it relates to what you will present

Rather than dread following an excellent speaker – ride the wave of energy and excitement. Express gratitude to the previous speaker, acknowledge how good they are then give the audience your best.

 

© 2016 iSpeakEASY. All rights reserved – This speaking tip is one in a series provided by iSpeakEASY. We help people profit from their words. Call for information on individual coaching or group workshops.

 

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