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Archive for 2018|Yearly archive page

Managing Difficult Audiences: A Workshop

In Uncategorized on April 17, 2018 at 10:19 PM

It Is Difficult To Present Controversial Or Unwanted Information

Have you needed to respond to a tough question, needed to deliver unwelcome information, or felt heckled at a program or meeting?  When done properly, both the audience and agency leave feeling heard and satisfied (even if not happy) with the results. When done poorly, it is like throwing gasoline on a fire. Your credibility will be questioned and you will leave feeling terrible. difficult audience

This session provides techniques to help set up and manage difficult discussions while remaining in control of the situation and  ensuring everyone has the opportunity to speak. You will learn techniques to diffuse conflict before it occurs, keep your meeting on-track , and provide respectful dialogue that allows everyone to share their opinion.

Participants will learn:

  • Tips to manage difficult meetings successfully
  • How to manage hecklers
  • To respond effectively to questions
  • Techniques to diffuse tense situations
  • Ways to determine when you are dealing with a “wolf in sheep’s clothing”
  • Techniques of Verbal Victories
  • To help your audience feel heard

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

10:30 AM– 2:30 PM

 Robert Livermore Community Center, Livermore, CA

 $110  per  person – To register

 (415) 342-7106

ethan@ispeakeasy.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Really Great Question

In Uncategorized on April 17, 2018 at 10:11 PM

 

I knew I was in trouble as soon as he blurted out “this is probably a really dumb question but…”

I knew I was about to hear a really basic question. The kind I am asked all the time. Something really basic and elementary that my perhaps my dog could answer. asking quesiton

I listened intently as he spoke and when he was done, I smiled as I replied, “that is a really great question”.

As a presenter, I hope the questions I am asked will be intellectually stimulating, challenging, and an opportunity for me demonstrate my credibility. This question was none of those.

In truth – it was a great question. What made it great was the fact that he was asking something that he did not know the answer. He was seeking to educate himself and to learn. This is the reason I speak – to help people see things in a new way and to help them discover new truths.

I watched his face light up as I affirmed the quality of his question. He listened carefully to my answer and from there; the conversation progressed down a related path. The audience appreciated the response as well. They knew they were safe asking a question without fear of belittlement. They saw the kindness offered by the presenter and the excitement I had as I gave the answer.

The response demonstrated that as speaker, I saw the audience as my equal. I did not feel superior to them, I welcomed their questions and inquiries and I was intent on helping them.

In truth, it was a pretty general question. The kind I get all the time. Yet I am so grateful he asked.

The next time you get a question that seems basic; perhaps even ridiculously simply, remember to answer it well. Take time to listen carefully to the question and be clear that you appreciate the question, even if it seems to be a very simple one. Be gracious and excited if not for the question itself, then for the opportunity to help a member of your audience. The manner in which you answer will speak volumes about the type of person you are.

 

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How To Decide What To Say (and what NOT to say)

In marketing, Public Speaking on January 30, 2018 at 3:44 AM

Think back to the last time you ate at a buffet: did you scan ahead to see what was buffet 1offered other than the food in front of you? You were probably thinking you have a limited amount of space in your belly and should fill it with those things most important to you. While you may have appreciated the abundance, you did not place equal value on all the choices. You took some of one dish while ignoring others completely.

Information is like this: some is very important to us while other information is of lesser value.

As speakers, we often feel the need to tell everything we know on a subject. We feel we are cheating, or not telling the whole truth, if some bit of information is left off. “Data dumps” tend to overwhelm, over stuff, or just plain bore the audience. Rather than going away with more information, listeners check out, and retain less.

It is up to you as speaker to determine which 3-5 bits of information are essential to your point. The most important info may vary from situation to situation even though the topic is the same. The objective of your talk, the audience, and what you want the audience to remember will determine which information is critical. Everything else should be left out. While this may seem hard, your audience will appreciate your efforts. You will make it easier for them to understand and retain the information you give them.

It is hard to cut information out of your talk. The goal, however, is to awaken and provoke the audience. If there is something not covered that is of interest to them, they will ask.

As you plan your next presentation, whether it is to a large group or one-on-one, take time to scan ahead at the great buffet of information ahead of you. Select what to say and what to leave out. This will help your audience remember your message while reducing the chances of over stuffing them.

 

 

© 2007 – This speaking tip is one in a series provided to you by iSpeakEASY.  Call for information on individual coaching or group training.